Learning Goal: I’m working on a humanities discussion question and need an expla

Learning Goal: I’m working on a humanities discussion question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.Please respond to any two student post. Minimum 100 words per reply.Collapse SubdiscussionMadeline TurcanMadeline Turcan TuesdaySep 14 at 4:05pmManage Discussion Entry 1. The significant connection between the song “Highway 61 Revisited” by Bob Dylan and the Bible story is they both guide us to the idea that whatever the divine intends to carry out is the ethical or correct thing to do. The “Divine Command Theory” can be referred to Plato’s writings where he states the meaning of goodness is piety or what god commands is right. For example, Socrates was accused of being impiety in the Athenian court, which meant Socrates was making the gods displeased or not being religious enough. Euthyphro was also in the Athenian court trying to prosecute his father for killing a servant. Socrates being Socrates started asking Euthyphro questions like “How do you know it is the right thing to do to persecute your father in the court?”. Euthyphro replied saying that it is the right thing to do to persecute a person who did wrong no matter how close that person would be to you. Socrates then asked him, how do you know what piety is? Socrates then goes on by asking “Whether the pious or holy is beloved by the gods because it is holy, or holy because it is beloved of the gods.” This quote itself shows that just because God says something is just a right does not mean that it is truly that, but it could be selfishness of opinion. In Abe’s story, he has to sacrifice Issac, his only son because god commanded it. However; if you look at the situation of a father killing his only son it is not morally right. 2. The song “No church in the wild” uses the Euthyphro dilemma dictated by Plato. The song also uses “state of nature” from Hobbes, which states that a hypothetical time exists before the moral and legal rules are applied. Specifically in this period, everyone has the same risk of being treated unfairly so people created a structure of laws and rules to not be treated unfairly. Similarly to this, Jay Z and Kanye share the same idea of the importance of values and laws. They also discuss that people who do not believe in God do not have enough guidance in their life. The song in specific does try to convey the same original message; however, it wants the listener to understand the Divine command theory that states God is the ultimate authority of what is morally good or bad. The song tries to understand the dilemma between God vs. good. The song demonstrates the meaning that society needs a set of rules to survive and the thought that God loves things that are good or things become good because God loves it. 3. Someone can be a religious person and hold God’s word over most; however, they can separate their moral ethics to theirs if it goes hand and hand. For example, Abraham had to kill his own son due to the fact that God saw it to be right. Someone who believes in the word of God can not believe killing their own son to be correct as well as believing everything God says, is correct. ReplyReply to CommentCollapse SubdiscussionRahiem HalsteadRahiem Halstead TuesdaySep 14 at 7:39pmManage Discussion EntryHey Madeline your response to the three question is very well put together with details and and common sense. Relating to question 1, I agree with your statement on god saying things is right because his own selfish reasons or opinion. do you believe god gives us choices on the matter of good or bad for his own selfishness to see who who deserves his blessing’s? ReplyReply to CommentCollapse SubdiscussionAntoinette PerezAntoinette Perez TuesdaySep 14 at 8:25pmManage Discussion EntryHi Rahiem, I agree with you that Madeline’s response was very well put together. In your own opinion what do you think? Do you believe we do things because God tells us to? Or do we do things because its the moral or immoral thing to do? Like I have said in my previous post I believe there are people who believe they hear God and they have to obey his words, even if it is the right or wrong thing to do or say. I cannot personally say what I would do if I heard the voice of God telling me what to do. ReplyReply to CommentCollapse SubdiscussionRahiem HalsteadRahiem Halstead WednesdaySep 15 at 12:05amManage Discussion EntryHey Antoinette thank you for the feedback and great question. I believe God already told us what to do in the bible while on earth and we are being tested through generations to keep his commandments the interesting part about it is a lot of the commandments make sense as far as making our lives better and will help us grow as good people. The scary part is that their are so many commandments to keep and you might feel like a hypocrite most of the time, but I commend everyone who wakes up everyday and try the best to their ability. ReplyReply to Comment
Collapse SubdiscussionAntoinette PerezAntoinette Perez TuesdaySep 14 at 8:18pmManage Discussion EntryHi Madeline, I defiantly agree with you on question number three. Someone could be religious and not hold God’s words or actions over most, and can separate their morals. However there are people in the world that believe that God talks to them and what he says must happen like Abraham killing his son because God saw it to be right. To him he had no choice because he heard the voice of God.What would you do? Do you believe that God lets us make our own decisions or does he make them for us and we do not hear his voice? ReplyReply to Comment
Collapse SubdiscussionBrendon PlunkettBrendon Plunkett WednesdaySep 15 at 7:33pmManage Discussion EntryMadeline, Good evening. Very thorough reply. In regards to question three, why do you think there was a change in Abraham in these two stories with relation to Devine Command Theory? At Sodom he argues with God asking if 50 righteous people are valued enough to save the city all the way down to 10 when their conversation ended. 4 chapters later Abraham is willing to kill his own son in going along with Devine Command Theory. Do you think there is something being conveyed in Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice something close to him after questioning God and asking 50 people are worth his mercey? ReplyReply to CommentCollapse SubdiscussionInas WigginsInas Wiggins ThursdaySep 16 at 3:01amManage Discussion EntryHi brendon You’ve mentioned a great point. Abraham questioned God about Sodom but was quick to sacrifice his own son. I think Abraham think his sacrifice is morally okay than innocent people dying because of one persons unjust. Do you think the two acts are equally moral? ReplyReply to CommentCollapse SubdiscussionKathleen BenedettiKathleen Benedetti ThursdaySep 16 at 10:58amManage Discussion EntryTo all that replied to Madeline (and everyone else)Two thoughts came into my mind-First is what is wrong with questioning whether something is right or wrong, even if it is an authority figure? As children, we ask a million questions trying to sort through the complexity of life- as we get older, sometimes curiosity (questioning) can be misperceived as a “challenge”. If you have questions, ask and if it is perceived as a challenge that is on the person you are questioning. Challenges can be seen as a threat but if explained it is curiosity and it is still seen threatening, know it is not you, but them. Continue to be curious like a child- that is how one learns.Second, when we say “god’s will” we must remember that it is an “interpretation” of god’s will by another individual. To my understanding, most of us do not have a direct line of communication with our higher power. Wars have been waged in the name of god. My daughter, while not religious, has read a lot of the bible. When I listen to her interpretation of “the word” , it gives me pause. Things I had not thought of before I needed to ponder over myself. IMHO (in my humble opinion), I like to hear these interpretations and then decide what my view is on that.tell me what you think ReplyReply to CommentCollapse SubdiscussionBrendon PlunkettBrendon Plunkett ThursdaySep 16 at 6:41pmManage Discussion EntryProf. Benedetti, The interpretation of religious writing defiantly changes from person to person. Some people will take it as definitive set of rules to follow verbatim and others as a guideline in their life. Interpreting what ever writings you follow would challenge an individual to compare it to what is accepted as “right’ or moral in a reasonable society and make their decisions as to what has a stronger value in their own life. The 5th commandment’s accurate translation is thou shall not murder rather than thou shall not kill. That would start a whole other conversation as to who sees the difference between the two and what circumstance would taking a life be acceptable. Curiosity is good, it lets you learn. Seeking out information or understanding why something is how it is, works the way it does is a great thing. It expands your mind and fills you with knowledge. Curiosity being perceived as challenging is can definitely be seen as a threat. A military member questioning an order they feel is unlawful, a subordinate questioning a supervisors directions in a business setting where the subordinate believed the directions to be a detriment the company or fellow worker. These situations are questioned out of curiosity but would definitely been seen as a challenge. Taking in other interpretations or points of view gives you more information to use or discard as you choose when deciding what stance you take or how you interpret something yourself. It shouldn’t hurt or been seen as a conflict, rather an opportunity to ponder an elsewise unthought of aspect whatever your subject may be. ReplyReply to CommentCollapse SubdiscussionKathleen BenedettiKathleen Benedetti ThursdaySep 16 at 8:08pmManage Discussion EntryBrendon,thank you for respondingYou said, ” The 5th commandment’s accurate translation is thou shall not murder rather than thou shall not kill. That would start a whole other conversation as to who sees the difference between the two and what circumstance would taking a life be acceptable. “agreed!!!This also reminds me of the idea that when we read ancient text we must remember it was based on the knowledge and values of a society during that time. For example:Jews and Muslims do not eat shellfish or pork products. This is most likely because shellfish are bottom feeders and carried many diseaese, including Hepatitis (not called that at the time). Pork carried parasites (trichinosis). Today many people serve apple sauce with their pork. This is because it was found that the natural enyzmes in apples killed the parasite (a little known fact for you in your next trivia challenge.. :). ) It was a way to keep people from dying of the illnesses caused by these foods. Both of these issues are not really problems, today but the traditions continue. Below is a link to passages in the bible that support these dietary restrictions.Biblical dietary requirements (Links to an external site.)I could give you a whole lecture on the Hippocrsaic oath ( the pledge taken when an individual graduates from medical school). It has been grossly misinterpreted and individuals today try to use it to defend their anti-abortion and anti-euthanasia views. Both were common practices in the time of Hippocrates.My point is, these texts need to be viewed from the context of the timefrsme in which they were written.thoughts?Edited by Kathleen Benedetti on Sep 16 at 8:09pm ReplyReply to CommentSHOW MORE 22
Collapse SubdiscussionBrendon PlunkettBrendon Plunkett 12:11amSep 18 at 12:11amManage Discussion EntryInas I just found it conflicting, just in those two passages. Abraham questions God’s will in his willingness to destroy a city’s population because of their debauchery but asks God, well what if there some good people in this city who worship you , can we give it a pass. Then when God demands the sacrifice of Abraham’s own son his reply is sure go load up the mules. Now I am only using these two specific passages in saying I saw a conflict in Abrahams own moral code of right and not right. ReplyReply to Comment
Collapse SubdiscussionSalvatore SciasciaSalvatore Sciascia YesterdaySep 17 at 6:02pmManage Discussion EntryMadeline,Great job in describing the Divine Command Theory. I like how you bring up Platos writings of goodness is piety or what god commands is right. I struggled with this theory when applying it to my own life. Did you find yourself with internal conflict as well ? ReplyReply to Comment
Collapse SubdiscussionSofia BurciagaSofia Burciaga 1:04pmSep 18 at 1:04pmManage Discussion EntryHello Madeline,Great post! I really liked what you wrote, it is true that no matter how close a person is to you, truth and ethics always come first. It is critical to tell the truth because it will aid everyone’s growth. When you learn how to appropriately communicate and share your feelings with others, you will be a better person. ReplyReply to Comment
Collapse SubdiscussionRahiem HalsteadRahiem Halstead TuesdaySep 14 at 6:52pmManage Discussion EntryRAHIEM HALSTEADWEEK 2 DISCUSSIONQUESTION 1 – The bible story of Abraham called by god to kill his own son and Dylan music song “Highway 61 Revisited” by Karen “O as well as ethics and the Divine Command Theory all connect with decision making. To my understanding the story of Abraham called by God to kill his own son was a test of faith from God to Abraham without any explanation which put Abraham in a position where he had to make a choice to trust God and follow his instructions or do what he thinks is right in that situation. Ethics can relate to this discussion because we all deal with everyday decision making on matters that we believe are good or bad while factoring our personal moral and beliefs. The divine command theory by Euthyphro questions what makes any decision we make right or what makes any decisions we make wrong.QUESTION 2 – I believe no church in the wild song by rappers Jay -Z and Kanye West implemented lyrics said by Jay-Z and I quote from the discussion question “Im wonderin’ if a thugs prayers reach is pious(religion) pious(religion)’ cause god loves pious(religion)? Socrates asks. “whose bias do yall seek? All for Plato screech”. This quote relates to the dialog with Plato asking Euthyphro who makes our decision good or bad off. While listening to the whole song I believe the song is pointing out the lifestyle different people are living according to their own morals and judgements and whose to say its right or wrong. In other words, a person can commit a certain act that can be considered wrong according to their own morals but because the act may feel good to them or be excepted by society, they can convince there self that the act is right but whose to say that persons actions is write or wrong. ReplyReply to CommentCollapse SubdiscussionInas WigginsInas Wiggins ThursdaySep 16 at 9:32amManage Discussion EntryHi Rahiem,I agree with your response to question 1. Ethics and Divine Command Theory will have any person making an important decision. A very tough decision if that person is religious and they put their religion above their own morals. Do you think Abraham’s decision to sacrifice his son ethical? Do you think someone morals are different than God’s command?You’ve answered question 3 well. I didn’t look at it that way, people perform wrongful acts even though they’re morally against it, but society accepts it. I figured people will not perform any unjust act if they agree with it morally. ReplyReply to CommentCollapse SubdiscussionRahiem HalsteadRahiem Halstead ThursdaySep 16 at 11:48pmManage Discussion EntryHey InasThank you for the feedback I think Abraham knew his decision was unethical but his faith grew strong especially when he seen what happened in the city of Sodom. I think gods commandments helps the believers to obtain good morals. ReplyReply to Comment
Collapse SubdiscussionKathleen BenedettiKathleen Benedetti ThursdaySep 16 at 11:07amManage Discussion EntryRahiem,You said, “Ethics can relate to this discussion because we all deal with everyday decision making on matters that we believe are good or bad while factoring our personal moral and beliefs. “yes, yes, yes!!! and our personal beliefs are influenced by our family, social circle and their, as well as our own experiences. What we need to do understand that these experiences become our perceptions. We must also be careful that these perceptions do not become a bias. Here is an example: My ethnicity is Irish and German. Growing up, I was told that if I ever was afraid , lost or in trouble, find a policeman. My parent taught me they are is my “friend” and will help me. That is my perception. If I tried to convince a black child on the south side of Chicago that policemen were their friends too and not believe that their experience was different than mine, that would be a bias.we need to be careful of biases- what do you think? ReplyReply to CommentCollapse SubdiscussionRahiem HalsteadRahiem Halstead ThursdaySep 16 at 11:34pmManage Discussion EntryHey Ms. Kathleen Thank you for the feedback I agree with you i believe we all should be careful of being bias to other individuals that may have different experience then us, but I often get confused. where do we draw the line when dealing with bias behavior and different individuals perspectives, is it possible for both those words to exist in the same space? ReplyReply to CommentCollapse SubdiscussionKathleen BenedettiKathleen Benedetti YesterdaySep 17 at 9:47amManage Discussion EntryRahiem,You said, “where do we draw the line when dealing with bias behavior and different individuals perspectives, is it possible for both those words to exist in the same space?”This is certainly a difficult dilemma- I think the best we can do is try to recognize our own biases (we all have them) and try to change our behavior or attitudes around them. If it is someone close to us gently point out theirs (hoping they realize it). As far as perspectives, I think that is easier- we must respect and even validate someone else’s experiences. The only thing in our true control are our thoughts and actions- the rest is out of our control (a little scary, right).You question is a very difficult one- hope this helps a bit…. agsin this is my humble opinion. ReplyReply to CommentCollapse SubdiscussionRahiem HalsteadRahiem Halstead YesterdaySep 17 at 5:54pmManage Discussion EntryHey Ms. Kathleen Your answer to my question is great and you are on point with your solution. I do believe that being respectful is the key no matter what because we can control our action, and I say only actions because sometimes we cannot control our thoughts. ReplyReply to Comment
Collapse SubdiscussionBrendon PlunkettBrendon Plunkett 12:46amSep 18 at 12:46amManage Discussion EntryProf. Benedetti Is it presumptuous thinking you would have to convince a black child on the south side of Chicago that a police officer would be there friend? Beyond recognizing different experiences in growing up, geographical location, economic status, gender, race why would it be assumed that a black child from the south side would need to be convinced? ReplyReply to CommentCollapse SubdiscussionKathleen BenedettiKathleen Benedetti 10:58amSep 18 at 10:58amManage Discussion EntryBrendon,I used the south side of Chicago just as an example of a minority, lower socioeconomic group of individuals whose view of law enforecment is most likely different than mine.Actually, I used example a number iof times to illustrate bias when I teach onsite. When I used it in my Newark classes, many of my students would laugh when I said “policemen are your friends”. Many told me they were taught (through experience) to walk the other way when they saw police. If I told them they were wrong about police, I would be trying to convince them their experience was wrong and mine was right and that is bias…Another example, I have a good friend (African american) who lives in Montclair. She would not aloow her sons to wear hooded sweatshirts. If I were to try and convince her that hooded sweatshirts did not effect society’s treatment or opinions of a young minority man. that would have been my bias. I assume some do believe police are the good guys, but even as we see on the news, that is not always the case.Does this make more sense? ReplyReply to Comment
Collapse SubdiscussionSalvatore SciasciaSalvatore Sciascia YesterdaySep 17 at 6:08pmManage Discussion EntryRahiem, Outstanding work in breaking this all down. I like how you state that Abrahams test of killing his son was just that, a test from god of faith. His obedience and willingness is a great example of the Devine Command Theory. Do you think ethically Abrahams choice to decided to kill ( or attempt to kill ) his son , was correct because it was commanded by god? ReplyReply to Comment
Collapse SubdiscussionBrendon PlunkettBrendon Plunkett TuesdaySep 14 at 7:29pmManage Discussion Entry Highway 61 and the story of Abraham and his son are connected with the Divine Command Theory in they both speak about willingness to accept and act on what we normally accept in society as an unlawful or immoral act. Willing to only because it is deemed as Gods want,. Though told in different ways, a folk song’s catchy but disguised words and a bible story relaying a moral , they share the same theme because my god says it is their pleasure it must be acceptable therefor I should be willing to do it. In seeing Dylan’s first stanza as an anti war song we are shifting our idea of a god (in keeping with Abraham’s story) as a deity to a government ruling over our idea of right and wrong. Thou Shall Not Kill , unless it suits the current needs of the government. Having faith and believing in a god varies from person to person in what it means in their life and how they use their faith to guide their moral compass. There are some who take their scripture as literal and to be followed to the letter, others read it as stories put together as a guide to their faith and morality. With Abraham at Sodom God’s want was questioned because it was not right in Abraham’s mind, the innocent being punished along with the wicked because it was God’s will. Believing in some greater existence does not mean one does not also believe in what we take as basic morality in a reasonable society. The golden rule passes through as a common theme in religions as well as what we take as morally correct in a reasonable society. ReplyReply to Comment
Collapse SubdiscussionAntoinette PerezAntoinette Perez TuesdaySep 14 at 8pmManage Discussion EntryQuestion #2 What does the song “No Church in the Wild” use from Plato’s dialogue Euthyphro? What do you understand the song to be trying to say with that quote in this song? Is the song using the quote from Plato to convey a different meaning than it has in the dialogue by Plato?What I believe the song “No Church in the Wild” uses from Plato’s dialogue Euthyphro is to question what people might believe to be right and wrong, however it truly all depends from who’s view you are looking at the situation that one might come to their own conclusion. My understanding of the song when he quotes “I’m wonderin’ if a thug’s prayers reach” I think he is asking does God hear the prayers of what we call a sinner, or does God only take care of those who he considers good or perfect the non sinners. When he says “Is Pious pious ‘cause God loves pious? He is basically asking does god only love the religious peopleSocrates asks, “whose bias do y’all seek?’ All for Plato, screech” He could be saying that everything that we read and hear has a bias about it, bias as meaning to influence someone’s opinion to join one side or another.I believe both artist are trying to convey the same message of Plato’s dialogue Euthyphro in the song. Basically he is asking who ultimately decides what is Godly and of ethical and moral value, no one should be judged. Question #3 How might a person be a theist (believing in god), but still not accept Euthyphro’s Divine Command Theory for how best to live?Just because a person believes in God does not mean they have to accept that something good or bad has happened is because God commanded it. They just might think its faith or destiny. ReplyReply to CommentCollapse SubdiscussionRahiem HalsteadRahiem Halstead WednesdaySep 15 at 12:18amManage Discussion EntryHey AntoinetteYour responds to question 2 has a great explanation for the quote “im wonderin if a thugs prayers reach” i was thinking the same thing but i was not sure. regarding question 3 that you answered, do you think its healthy to believe in God but not try to follow his commandments or have faith in them? ReplyReply to Comment
Collapse SubdiscussionKathleen BenedettiKathleen Benedetti ThursdaySep 16 at 11:13amManage Discussion EntryAntoinette,You said, “My understanding of the song when he quotes “I’m wonderin’ if a thug’s prayers reach” I think he is asking does God hear the prayers of what we call a sinner, or does God only take care of those who he considers good or perfect the non sinners.”This comes down to the question can one (or God) separate actions from individual? As parents, we love our children and many times hate their behavior. What kind of world do you (anyone) think we could have if we were able to do this with not just our children but all people? ReplyReply to Comment
Collapse SubdiscussionKadasia MerrittKadasia Merritt 11:56amSep 18 at 11:56amManage Discussion EntryHi AntontteGreat answer. I agree with your idea that everything we read and hear has a bias about it. However, I disagree that it was what the song is referring to. I think that they are implementing that because Pluto actually attended the trial and wrote this dialog were are actually reading from his point of view on what occurred. Also i can agree that some people do live by faith and destiny as supposed as living by Gods commands due to their own personal morals on what is right and wrong to them, but who are we to judge? ReplyReply to Comment
Collapse SubdiscussionSofia BurciagaSofia Burciaga 1:14pmSep 18 at 1:14pmManage Discussion EntryHello Antoinette,In my opinion, it does not depend on us to know who does good and who does bad because we cannot judge a person about how they are or how they dress but rather the judgment is only up to God. It is not up to us as people to judge someone else’s actions. ReplyReply to Comment
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